Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11147/4410
Title: Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar compression testing of an aluminum alloy: Effect of lubricant type
Authors: Hall, Ian W.
Güden, Mustafa
Keywords: Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar
Compression test
High strain rate
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Source: Hall, I. W., and Güden, M. (2003). Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar compression testing of an aluminum alloy: Effect of lubricant type. Journal of Materials Science Letters, 22(21), 1533-1535. doi: 10.1023/A:1026167517837
Abstract: The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), or Kolsky Bar, is widely used for studying the dynamic mechanical properties of metals and other materials. A cylindrical specimen is sandwiched between the incident and transmitter bars, Fig. 1, and a constant amplitude elastic wave is generated by the striker bar. Strain gages mounted on the incident and transmitter bars allow the compressive stress-strain response of the specimen to be established using uniaxial elastic wave theory [1]. A more detailed overview of SHPB testing is found in [2]. Lubricant is usually applied to the interfaces because the presence of any frictional effect on the specimen surfaces forms a multiaxial stress-state and invalidates one of the most important assumptions of the SHPB analysis, namely, a uniaxial stress state. This paper quantifies the effect for an aluminum alloy.
URI: http://doi.org/10.1023/A:1026167517837
http://hdl.handle.net/11147/4410
ISSN: 0261–8028
Appears in Collections:Mechanical Engineering / Makina Mühendisliği
Scopus İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / Scopus Indexed Publications Collection
WoS İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / WoS Indexed Publications Collection

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